Friday, June 28, 2019

This Week in Pics

Mesa County Engineering staff, Laura Page and Wesley Thomas, check out parts of the Palisade Plunge Trail with Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Outdoor Recreation Planner Chris Pipkin, and Single Track Trails LLC Project Manager James Flatten and Logistics Manager Shannon Harness. 
Phase I of the Palisade Plunge will be getting underway in a few weeks, the first phase consists of 13.5 miles of trail from Highway 6 to Lands End Road. Mesa County Engineering staff, a BLM planner, and Single Track Trails LLC staff visited the site before construction gets underway. 
This photo shows the west part of the Palisade Plunge Trail that will be above the Palisade Rim Trail system. 
Construction on the Palisade Plunge Trail is scheduled to start on July 8, 2019, from the upper eastern portion of the trail off of Lands End Road.
Todd Hollenbeck, Community Development Director, received appreciation from Dave Karisny, Fruita City Council Member and Chairman of the Grand Valley Regional Transportation Committee, for his dedication and service as director of the Regional Transportation Planning Office from 2007 to 2019. Congratulations, Todd!

Help eliminate noxious weeds and receive a gift card to a local nursery in exchange! For details, visit https://bit.ly/2ISHQ0H. Pictured above is a noxious weed: Dame’s Rocket (Hesperis matronalis), which can outcompete native grasses and flowers and decrease diversity for wildlife forage.

Mesa County Coroner Victor Yahn and Colorado Mesa University Forensic Investigation Research interns worked together on a case at CMU's Forensic Investigation Research Station (FIRS). 
A gravesite was disturbed by rodents and CMU's FIRS interns assisted the Coroner's Office with getting it taken care of appropriately. 
On Thursday afternoon, Danny Manzanares, Senior Maintenance Technician, replaces batteries on thermostats in the old Mesa County Courthouse, 544 Rood Ave., to ensure they work correctly. This process is done every six months.
A contingent of elected officials alongside staff and supporters of the Jordan Cove Project from northwest Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming testified at the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's hearing Wednesday afternoon in  Medford, Oregon. Rose Pugliese, County Commissioner for Mesa County, Colorado, said: “The Jordan Cove project is a great economic driver for our northwest Colorado communities and will help stabilize our economies from fluctuations in the oil and gas market for over 20 years. It also helps us to then continue to diversify our economies and make our counties fiscally stronger.” Read more at https://bit.ly/2xfueWW.

Mesa County Commissioner Rose Pugliese testified before the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on Wednesday in Medford, Oregon in favor of the Jordan Cove project. It is important to her to represent counties in northwest Colorado, along with other commissioners, to express the desire to export our natural gas resources. Read more at https://bit.ly/31Z7VCT.

Mesa County Commissioner John Justman (right) testified at a Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's hearing Wednesday afternoon in  Medford, Oregon.
Mesa County Surveyor Scott Thompson maintains, perpetuates, and interprets legal records and public information which control land boundaries, property ownership, and associated interests for the citizens of Mesa County in order to safeguard real property and promote public welfare. Surveyor Thompson discusses issues associated with property fence lines and easements with Inside Mesa County Class participants.
Mesa County Public Works Director Pete Baier talks to the Inside Mesa County class about the 29 Road PEL study. To learn more about the study, visit https://bit.ly/2ITD6YN.

Mesa County Road and Bridge Manager Rudy Bevan explains current road work and projects to Inside Mesa County attendees. See a list of projects at https://bit.ly/2RDEQrO.
From left to right: Mesa County Fairgrounds Manager Donna Redd, Fair Board Member Andrew Weber, Fair Marketing Expert Mackenzie Dodge, and Fair Sponsor Cody Davis ​promote the 2019 Mesa County Fair​ at the ​Grand Junction Lions Club​'s​ meeting​.​​

Many Mesa County offices will be closed Thursday, July 4, in honor of Independence Day. For a detailed list of closures, visit https://bit.ly/2YlbRvq.

Thursday, June 27, 2019

Eliminate noxious weeds and receive a gift card to a local nursery


Help eliminate noxious weeds and receive a gift card to a local nursery in exchange!

Several popular ornamental landscaping plants are regulated noxious weeds that can cause damage to local infrastructure and wetlands, accidental poisoning and decrease wildlife forage.

To help you identify noxious and “obnoxious” weeds of all kinds, we will be hosting a booth at local nurseries throughout the summer.  Visit us at:

Mt. Garfield Greenhouse and Nursery: July 1, 2 to 5 p.m.

Valley Grown Nursery: July 2, 9 a.m. to 12 p.m.

Check your flower-beds to see if you have one of the following, then stop by to exchange it for a gift card for a non-invasive native or cultivated replacement:

Giant reed grass (Arundo donax)


  • A bamboo-like perennial grass 
  • Can grow 20+ feet tall 
  • Spreads mainly through its vast root system
  • An aggressive, non-native species that has overtaken many acres of wetland/riparian corridors throughout the Southwestern U.S. and can reduce wildlife habitat, increase fire risk, and interfere with flood control while suppressing native plant growth



Plants might not be easily removed by pulling/digging as roots left in the ground can regenerate; however, they can be effectively managed with proper herbicide application (click here for further details). It is important to take proper precautions to protect yourself when cutting down/digging up plants as the woody like stalks can cause cuts/slivers. Protect from exposure to any herbicides by wearing proper attire and following directions on the label.



Cypress spurge (Euphorbia cyparissias)


  • A popular plant in rock gardens in the Grand Valley.
  • Low-growing perennial 
  • Thin, bright green, needle-like leaves, and unique yellow-green flowers that can turn reddish when spherical seed pods form
  • All parts of the plant contain a white latex sap that can cause mild to severe skin, eye, and respiratory irritation




Plants can be removed by pulling/digging up the entire plant including the tap-root, or sprayed with a recommended herbicide (click here for further details). It is important to take proper precautions to protect yourself from exposure to the toxic sap and any herbicides by wearing proper attire.

Myrtle spurge (Euphorbia myrsinites)


  • A popular plant in rock gardens in the Grand Valley
  • Low-growing perennial plant
  • Thick blue-green leaves (somewhat resembling a succulent), and unique yellow-green flowers that can turn reddish when spherical seed pods form
  • All parts of the plant contain a white latex sap that can cause mild to severe skin, eye, and respiratory irritation



Plants can be removed by pulling/digging up the entire plant including the tap-root or sprayed with a recommended herbicide. It is important to take proper precautions to protect yourself from exposure to the toxic sap and any herbicides by wearing appropriate attire.



Dame’s Rocket (Hesperis matronalis)


  • Popular in wildflower packets, this plant is threatening to spread into USFS land and Vega Lake State Park from private property
  • Found in many local flower beds; a look-a-like to non-invasive native and cultivated ornamentals
  • Can outcompete native grasses and flowers and decrease diversity for wildlife forage
  • Biennial/perennial plant that can grow ~3 feet tall each season
  • Flowers can be purple, pink, to white



Plants can be easily removed by pulling/digging the entire tap root out of the ground and disposing of plants and seeds in the garbage.

Japanese and Giant Knotweed, and hybrid Bohemian Knotweed
(Polygonum cuspidatum, P. cuspidatum, P. x bohemicum)


  • An interesting perennnial plant with large heart-shaped leaves and bamboo-like stalks
  • Can grow 5-16 feet tall and spreads through root system underground
  • Showy clusters of tiny white flowers present in late summer
  • Often planted for erosion control or privacy screening, these plants can aggressively spread and clog small waterways and outcompete other desirable species


Plants might not be easily removed by pulling/digging as roots left in the ground can regenerate; however, they can be effectively managed with proper herbicide application (click here for further details). It is important to take proper precautions to protect yourself when cutting down/digging up plants as the woody like stalks can cause cuts/slivers. Protect from exposure to any herbicides by wearing proper attire and following directions on the label.

To redeem a gift card to a local nursery, please provide proof of the removal/treatment of the above outlined noxious weeds on your property in the following way:

Bring proof of removal to our booth at local nurseries throughout the summer and redeem a gift card on the spot!

OR

Take before and after photos of the area where the plants are located, with a distinguishing feature on your property somewhere in the pictures so we can confirm that these plants were indeed located on and removed from your property. Please take care to dispose of plants in the trash or landfill (NOT the compost!) so pieces do not get littered around. If you choose to spray plants, please describe your actions and take the “after” picture when plants show signs of herbicide poisoning.

Send pictures by email to weed.pest@mesacounty.us or text them (970) 250-3174 with your contact information and property address included.

Mesa County Noxious Weed & Pest Management will be available to assist with identification and to confirm removal/treatment throughout the summer if appropriate.

When removal or effective treatment is confirmed by the Mesa County Noxious Weed & Pest Management a gift card to a local nursery will be mailed to the property owner/occupant that submitted the pictures.

Keep in mind that continued monitoring and removal/treatment of these noxious weeds may be required for 3-5 years as established stands may have abundant nutrient reserves in the roots and viable seeds left in the soil and can continue to persist in growth after initial treatment/removal. Continued treatment or removal when new growth is present will help eventually deplete the energy storage and seed bank of the plant.

Mesa County Noxious Weed & Pest Management is a program dedicated to locating, treating, and educating the public about noxious weeds in conjunction with the Colorado State Department of Agriculture and other agencies. This project is funded by Mesa County and the Colorado Department of Agriculture. We thank you for your cooperative efforts in noxious weed management!

Eligibility is subject to Mesa County Noxious Weed & Pest Management approval.  One gift card issued per household per calendar year.

Wednesday, June 26, 2019

County Offices Closed on the Fourth of July


Many Mesa County offices will be closed Thursday, July 4, in honor of Independence Day.

This closure includes:
Administration, Assessor, County Commissioners, County Attorney, Financial Services, Human Resources, IT, Surveyor, Treasurer (544 Rood Ave.)
Clerk & Recorder: Motor Vehicle, Recording, Elections, Clerk to the Board (200 S. Spruce St.)
Department of Human Services (510 29 1/2 Road)
District Attorney's Office (125 N. Spruce St.)
Facilities and Fairgrounds (2785 U.S. Hwy. 50)
Grand Valley Transit fixed and paratransit services (525 S. 6th St.)
Public Health (510 29 1/2 Road)
Public Works, Building, and Planning (971 Coffman Road & 200 S. Spruce St.)
Regional Transportation Planning Office (525 S. 6th St.)
Sheriff’s Office: Records and Civil Divisions (215 Rice St.)
Solid Waste Management Campus (3071 U.S. Hwy. 50)
Tri-River CSU Extension (2775 U.S. Hwy. 50)
Workforce Center (512 29 1/2 Road)

Alternate Hours:
Animal Services (971A Coffman Road) will be open from 11 a.m. - 1 p.m.

This closure does NOT include:
Coroner's Office
Criminal Justice Services (all locations)
Sheriff's Office - jail, patrol, emergency services (215 Rice St.)

Monday, June 24, 2019

Commissioners comment on Zero-Emmission Vehicle Rule, Wilderness Study Areas and Jordan Cove Project

This week, the Board of Mesa County Commissioners adopted a resolution opposing Colorado's Proposed Zero-Emission Vehicle Rule and approved a letter to Congresswoman Diana DeGette regarding Mesa County's opposition to the Colorado Wilderness Act of 2019. The Board also approved a comment letter to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, regarding the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Pacific Connector Gas Pipeline, L.P. and Jordon Cove Energy Project L.P.

The resolution is in opposition to a proposed rule by Governor Jared Polis to support the electrification of transportation. Mesa County's economy is heavily dependent on mining, manufacturing, oil and gas, and agricultural sectors which depend on pickup trucks and other vehicles which cannot comply with the Zero Emissions Standards.




The Colorado Wilderness Act of 2019 was introduced to the United States House of Representatives in May 2019. The Act proposes more than 740,000 acres of Wilderness in Colorado, with more than 140,000 acres of proposed Wilderness in Mesa County. The Board of County Commissioners adopted a Resolution in 2015 opposing the Colorado Wilderness Act (“Act”) of 2015 and calling on Congress to release Wilderness Study Areas from such designations.



This letter is the Board of Mesa County Commissioner's comments regarding the Jordan Cove Energy Project L.P., Pacific Connector Gas Pipeline L.P.; Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Proposed Jordan Cove Energy Project.