Friday, January 3, 2020

This Week in Pics

Mesa County Public Health's Flu-View meters are on the move, meaning flu activity in Mesa County is picking up. Influenza is a respiratory illness with symptoms of fever, body aches, and cough. It can lead to severe complications, even in otherwise healthy individuals. An annual vaccine is your best protection, and it's not too late to get a flu shot! https://health.mesacounty.us/influenza-hospitalizations-increase-in-mesa-county/.
Mesa County maintains 24-hour coverage during and after storms until near normal driving conditions are restored. What can be expected? A sand and salt mixture is applied to the road surface for better traction and ice abatement. The use of mag-chloride is also used on several snow plow routes throughout the county. Roads and streets within incorporated cities are not included in Mesa County's program. Learn more at http://blog.mesacounty.us/2019/12/snow-removal-program.html.
Here's a look at the beautiful view from Knowles Overlook Campground in Mack, Colorado, to ring in the new year. 
This week, Mesa County Commissioner Rose Pugliese met with community leaders, economic development partners, and a few Colorado senators and representatives to discuss Rural Jumpstart Legislation. Pictured from left to right: Senator Ray Scott, Representative Dylan Roberts, Representative Janice Rich, and Commissioner Rose Pugliese.

The Criminal Justice Services Department (CJSD) hosted a soup potluck competition. Eighteen employees participated. Pictured: CJSD Supervisors James Bruner (left) and Shawn McNamara (right) enjoy lunch and the festivities.
The winner of  CJSD's soup potluck was Samantha Henderson, Criminal Justice Officer. Second Place was Suzanne Keel, Criminal Justice Case Manager.
Environmental Health Program Manager Heather Nara (left), MCPH Deputy Director Diana Williams (center), and Epidemiology Program Manager Heid Dragoo at an employee lunch at Mesa County Public Health.

Mesa County Public Health (MCPH) employees smile during a potluck celebration this holiday season. At MCPH, coworkers are like family; celebrating the season together was so fun!
Andy Tyler, Mesa County Public Health Regional Epidemiologist, talks to a local TV news crew about flu activity so far this season. You can monitor real-time data on the Flu-View page of health.mesacounty.us.
Amanda Jensen, Nurse-Family Partnership (NFP) Supervisor, (left) interviews on KFQX about the benefits of the program.  New moms are assigned their own personal nurse to help with the transition into motherhood.

Many local trails in the Grand Valley are muddy during the winter season, the best time to use local trails is when they are frozen or dry. Don't worry about muddy trails, head to the Grand Mesa for a day of snowshoeing or cross-country skiing. Mesa Lakes Recreation has a selection of trails ranging in length and difficulty level. For more info on Nordic Trails, check out GJ Hikes https://www.gjhikes.com/2012/12/grand-mesa-nordic-trails.html.

Sarah Brooks, Mobility Manager, spent Christmas Eve on the Grand Mesa snowshoeing along Sunset Lake and Mesa Creek Trail with her two pups Nellie (left) and Sydney (right).
Here's a view from the Grand Mesa. Without a doubt, it is the diverse terrain that makes Mesa County so incredibly beautiful.

Happy new year, Mesa County!

Monday, December 30, 2019

Snow Removal Program


Mesa County maintains 24-hour coverage during and after storms until near normal driving conditions are restored.

What can be expected? A sand and salt mixture is applied to the road surface for better traction and ice abatement. The use of mag-chloride is also used on several snow plow routes throughout the county.

Roads and streets within incorporated cities are not included in Mesa County's program.

Snowplowing usually begins around 2 a.m. and continues until all major roads and bus routes are clear of ice and snow. Plows are often out during the night time hours opening roads.

Mesa County's snow removal program includes the following:

  • Plows 641 miles of paved roads
  • Uses 34 trucks and four 1-ton trucks to plow paved roads
  • Considers 589 miles of paved roads a priority, which means they need to be cleared the first day
  • Plows 170 miles of gravel/dirt roads
  • Uses 13 graders to plow the gravel/dirt roads
  • Considers 144 miles of gravel/dirt roads a priority

For more information, go here or call (970) 244-1807.