Friday, March 13, 2020

This Week in Pics

Mesa County Public Health (MCPH) COVID-19 Response Team is working hard to distribute accurate and timely information to our community. For up-to-date information, visit health.mesacounty.us/covid19/.

Mesa County Public Health's website is our community's official location for accurate information regarding COVID-19. For current, reliable information, visit http://health.mesacounty.us/covid19/.


MCPH and agency leaders, including the Department of Human Services (DHS) Director Tracey Garchar (center left) and Undersheriff Todd Rowell (center), hosted Lieutenant Governor Dianne Primavera (center) to talk about community projects that are leading to healthier outcomes in Mesa County. 
Sarah Johnson, MCPH Community Network Coordinator, leads a discussion with Lt. Governor Primavera about community initiatives that are working to improve access to services for residents.
Mesa County Commissioners Scott McInnis, Rose Pugliese and John Justman, join Pete Baier, County Administrator, in taking an inaugural ride in the new elevator at the old Mesa County Courthouse, 544 Rood Ave. 

The Commissioners and County Administrator Pete Baier give the all-clear after the inaugural ride in the new elevator at the old Mesa County Courthouse. The elevator was out of service for about 8 weeks but is back in operation now.
The Board of Mesa County Commissioners proclaimed March as National Social Work Month and Director of Child Welfare Joe Kellerby (right) along with Mesa County social work professionals accepted the recognition in public hearing Monday morning.
DHS Director of Child Welfare and adult protection Joe Kellerby, and many social work professionals, accept the National Social Work Month Proclamation from the Board of Commissioners on March 9, the proclamation honors social work professionals for their hard work and dedication.

President and CEO of Strive, Grant Jackson, alongside a Strive client and Doug Sorter, Senior Vice President of Strive, join the Commissioners in proclaiming March 2020 as Developmental Disabilities Month.
During Monday's public hearing, the Commissioners received an update on the Palisade Plunge Project by Construction Group Manager Laura Page.
On Friday, March 6, Regional Transportation Planning Office (RTPO) staff took a tour of the Persigo Wastewater Treatment Plant, to learn more about how the compressed natural gas (CNG) for the buses is made. Pictured from left to right: Andrew Gingerich, Sarah Brooks and Dana Brosig.

At the Persigo Wastewater Treatment Plant, Mesa County RTPO staff learned about the water treatment process and how solids are broken down and turned into fuel for Grand Valley Transit (GVT) buses in the form of CNG. 
A DASH GVT bus gets fueled by CNG at the bus yard. Don't forget, March 18 is National Biofuel Day!
This week, a new cement walkway was poured at the Mesa County Fairgrounds, 2785 US-50. Upgrades to the facility continue as we get ready for Mesa County Fair 2020.

The gorgeous sunset highlights the newly poured sidewalk at the Mesa County Fairgrounds.

Crews continue to cut paths on the Palisade Plunge Trail. Much of the trail is through very remote back-country areas.

With more sun comes better weather, and the snow is starting to melt on many portions of Palisade Plunge.

Palisade Plunge Trail is definitely rugged, the trail goes around the rocks, or the rocks have to be moved. Either way, the rocks are integral in mitigating erosion and maintaining all the work being put into carving out this trail.

Mesa County, partner agencies and Mesa County Search and Rescue are working together to plan how to handle (future) emergency situations that may happen along the Palisade Plunge Trail. This group will be identifying helicopter landing zones and roadway access points. It's all a challenge because of the remoteness of most of the trail.

This view of the valley looking west includes the Colorado River, Mt. Garfield and Interstate 70.

Friendly reminder: even though everyone is excited to start using the Palisade Plunge, the trail isn't open to the public.
County leadership gathered to kick off the first meeting of the Mesa County Resource Management Plan (RMP) with the newly appointed Steering Committee members.

Commissioner Rose Pugliese discusses how and why the RMP Steering Committee was put together. Committee members were appointed to a term beginning Monday, March 9, 2020, and concluding December 31, 2020, or until the Mesa County Resource Management Plan has been formally adopted by the Board of County Commissioners.
Commissioner John Justman thanks staff and the RMP Steering Committee for their commitment and dedication.

Todd Hollenbeck, Mesa County Community Development Director, addresses the participants at the RMP Steering Committee meeting and talks about the expertise the individuals appointed to the committee offers. Appointees were selected based on significant knowledge of and generally long-term experience and familiarity with Mesa County’s natural resources. A balance of interest and expertise in outdoor recreation, environmental issues, agriculture, travel management and trails, energy, water, archaeology, and wildlife was a priority in making the appointments.

Commissioner Justman waits to testify against House Bill 1349, Colorado Affordable Health Care Option on Wednesday afternoon. Learn more about the bill at https://leg.colorado.gov/bills/hb20-1349.
County Administrator Pete Baier holds a meeting to talk to key staff on what Mesa County is doing to distribute accurate and timely information to our community. For up-to-date information, visit health.mesacounty.us/covid19/.
When you respond to the census, you help your community get its fair share of federal funds spent on schools, hospitals, roads, public works, and other vital programs. Businesses use census data to decide where to build factories, offices, and stores, and this creates jobs. Developers use the census to build new homes and revitalize old neighborhoods. Local governments use the census for public safety and emergency preparedness. Learn more at https://www.census.gov/en.html.
Jesse Bond, a social caseworker with DHS, received a wonderful donation of items from the Humanists Doing Good Organization. These items will help many families in need.

Donation items from the Humanists Doing Good Organization will help many Mesa County families in need. Thank you for the wonderful donations!
Euziveo Muniz and Jodi McKenna with the Economic Assistance Division share program information at the Men of Mesa Resiliency Skills Workshop, which was held Saturday, March 7, at St. Mary's Hospital.
DHS leadership served root beer floats, and creamsicle floats to personnel on Staff Appreciation Day. Brandy Bentley enjoys a float. 
Nick Ewing enjoys a float prepared by the DHS Senior Leadership Team.

Monday, March 9, 2020

Proclamations Presented for Developmental Disabilities and National Social Work Month

March 2020 is Developmental Disabilities and National Social Work Month. Mesa County Commissioners presented proclamations today in public hearing, encouraging residents to observe this month by participating in activities that increase public awareness.

The Board of Mesa County Commissioners proclaimed March 2020 as Developmental Disabilities Awareness Month and recognizes that our communities are stronger when everyone participates.
The Board of Mesa County Commissioners proclaimed March 2020 as Developmental Disabilities Month in Mesa County. Grant Jackson, president and CEO of Strive, and members of the organization accept the proclamation presented by the Board of Mesa County Commissioners.
The Board of Mesa County Commissioners proclaimed March 2020 as National Social Work Month in Mesa County and encourages citizens to support the social work profession. 

March 2020 is National Social Work Month in Mesa County. Director of Child Welfare Joe Kellerby (right) alongside other Mesa County Social Work Professionals accepted the National Social Work Month proclamation presented by the Board of Mesa County Commissioners.

Old Courthouse Elevator Back in Service


The elevator at the old Mesa County Courthouse, 544 Rood Ave., has been replaced and is back in service as of today, March 9, 2020. The project is one week ahead of the anticipated completion date.

A few aesthetic finishing touches are still pending. However, work will be done after-hours and on weekends. The elevator will be in service during regular business hours. The 32-year-old elevator was replaced due to the inability to get replacement parts.

“The elevator was inspected and approved for use. However, the project is not totally completed,” Mesa County Facilities & Parks Director Greg Linza said.  “The contractor is still required to install new interior finishes, which will be completed during March during weekend and after-hours.”

Departments housed in the old courthouse include Administration, Assessor, Commissioners, County Attorney, GIS, Human Resources, Information Technology, Purchasing, Risk Management, Surveyor, and Treasurer. To view a list of services, visit https://www.mesacounty.us/contact-us/location/old-courthouse/.

Mesa County is committed to addressing needs and services to serve the community through the completion of the elevator project.