Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Thirty-Three Weeks of Trail Building

The Palisade Plunge Trail crew got a slight breather from heavy bedrock work this week. How long this break will last is unknown, but it has been well received by the crew members allowing them to cut another 900 feet of new trail, leaving them at approximately milepost 27.72.

The Palisade Plunge Trail crew is working their way toward the top of the ridge.
Last Thursday, a couple crew members went up to higher elevations to scout out the condition of their campsite from last year. Once SingleTrack Trails reestablishes a campground, a second crew will begin working down toward the team working up from Palisade. Once these crews connect the four miles between them, Phase 1 of the trail will be nearly complete.

End of the line at approximately milepost 27.72.
A view from the Palisade Plunge Trail.
At week 33 of the Palisade Plunge Trail, about 13 miles of finished trail has been completed, and 0.30 miles of rough-cut trail is left to be hand-finished. This leaves about four miles to go before completion of Phase 1 of the trail.

Phase 2 will begin this year as soon as weather permits. A preconstruction meeting was held on Tuesday, May 5, for Phase 2 planning.

Mesa County was awarded a $527,000 grant for Phase 1 from the State of Colorado Department of Natural Resources, Beautification Trails Grant. The total cost of the project is estimated at $685,249. Phase 2 has been awarded a separate grant.

Tuesday, May 5, 2020

County Comments on Renewal of Grazing Permits


The Board of Mesa County Commissioners sent a letter to the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) regarding the renewal of grazing permits.

The letter states:

"Agriculture, as a whole, is an important component, of not only the culture and lifestyle of Mesa County, but also of our region's economy.  According to the Colorado State University Extension, Department of Agriculture and Business, livestock sales contributed 48.7 million dollars to Mesa County's economy with a multiplier between 2.6 and 2.8 for a community impact of more than $263 million."

"...Given the many benefits of grazing on our public lands and economy, we ask that the BLM strive for a timely review and approval of the permit renewals..."

View the letter here.




Highway 340 at Colonial Drive Project Update

Crews add the finishing touches to the soil nail wall on the south side of Colonial Drive. 

The road-widening project on Highway 340 at Colonial Drive to accommodate left-turn lanes, reached a significant milestone with the completion of the soil nail wall on the south side of the road last week.

However, the project will be delayed for approximately a month to allow utility crews to lower two gas lines that were found to be too shallow.

It's anticipated that the project will be completed in June 2020.

The road has been widened to allow for an auxiliary left turn lane for three separate intersections on to Highway 340.

The total project length is approximately ¼ mile. A portion of the widening encroached onto a significant cut slope requiring excavation and stabilization by constructing a soil nail wall about 300 feet in length and a maximum height of eight feet.

Monday, May 4, 2020

Progress Continues on 16 Road and Q.5 Bridge Realignment

Crews pour the bridge deck on the newly realigned bridge on 16 Road and Q.5.

Last week, crews from Con-Sy, Inc. poured the bridge deck on the new, realigned bridge on 16 Road and Q.5 over the Highline Canal.

The old bridge location caused the road to approach on a sharp curve and has been the site of multiple traffic accidents, including some fatalities.

The project is expected to be completed by the end of June 2020.

Mesa County was awarded a 50/50 grant from the Department of Local Affairs, Energy Impact Program, on a $1,663,449.00 contract with Con-Sy Inc., a local firm.

Economic Development Week is May 4-9, 2020

Diane Schwenke, President of the Grand Junction Chamber of Commerce, accepts the Economic Development Week Proclamation presented by the Board of Mesa County Commissioners during the public hearing on Monday, May 4.

The Board of Mesa County Commissioners proclaimed May 4-9, 2020, as Economic Development Week and reminded individuals of the importance of this community celebration, which supports the expansion of career opportunities.

Economic developers promote economic well-being and quality of life for their communities by creating, retaining, and expanding jobs that facilitate growth, enhance wealth, and provide a stable tax base.

Economic Development Week is May 4-9, 2020, in Mesa County.


Economic developers are engaged in a wide variety of settings, including rural and urban, local, state, provincial, and federal governments, public-private partnerships, chambers of commerce, universities, and a variety of other institutions.

Diane Schwenke, President of the Grand Junction Chamber of Commerce, gives thanks to the Board of Mesa County Commissioners for proclaiming May 4-9, 2020, as Economic Development Week.

Several local economic development entities have formed the Mesa County Economic Development First Responders team to collectively work together to help facilitate the economic road to recovery.

The group has been compiling a 20 for 2020 list of needed infrastructure projects that could assist with putting people back to work and improving our economic development prospects.

May is Foster Parent Appreciation Month

Joe Kellerby, Director of Child Welfare for the Department of Human Services, accepts the Foster Care Appreciation Month Proclamation presented by the Mesa County Commissioners during the public hearing Monday, May 4, 2020.

Today the Board of Mesa County Commissioners proclaimed May 2020, as Foster Parent Appreciation Month in Mesa County.

Every child deserves a safe, loving, and permanent home. Sadly, there are abused and neglected children who come into the care of the Mesa County Department of Human Services every day.

May is Foster Care Appreciation Month in Mesa County.


In Mesa County, there are over 100 children and youth in foster care being provided with a safe, secure, and stable home. These children often have unique medical, psychological, or physical needs.

Foster care providers give these children a safe environment where patience, kindness, and caring can be learned and where each child’s life can change for the better.

DHS Director of Child Welfare Joe Kellerby briefs the Board of Mesa County Commissioners on the importance of foster parents, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Through partnerships with families, child welfare staff, and public and private agencies, there is a collaborative effort to ensure that children in Mesa County are supported and successful.

During National Foster Parent Month, we celebrate all those who have invited a child in need into their hearts and into their homes and express our appreciation for all who help make foster care possible.

National Correctional Officers' Week is May 3-9, 2020


Mesa County Sheriff Matt Lewis (left) and Detentions Captain Art Smith (right) accept the National Correctional Officers' Week Proclamation presented by the Board of Mesa County Commissioners on Monday, May 4. 

The Board of Mesa County Commissioners proclaimed May 3-9, 2020, as Correctional Officers' Week in Mesa County, and publicly salutes the service of detention deputies in our community and in communities across the nation.

Correctional officers are trained law enforcement professionals dedicated to maintaining secure correctional facilities and ensuring the public's safety.

May 3-9, 2020, is Correctional Officers' Week in Mesa County.

Correctional officers in local jails across the country admit and process more than 10 million people a year, with nearly 700,000 offenders in jail at any given time nationwide.

Correctional officers are some of the most resourceful, capable, committed, patient, and persistent professionals in criminal justice and in our nation.

Mesa County Sheriff Matt Lewis (left) and Detentions Captain Art Smith (right) accept the National Correctional Officers' Week Proclamation presented by the Board of Mesa County Commissioners on Monday, May 4. 

To date, there have been more than 700 correctional officers killed in the line of duty.

Mesa County Sheriff's Office Deputy Edward Innes was killed on September 27, 1906, during an inmate jail escape, and Sergeant Joshua Eli Voth of the Colorado Department of Corrections was killed December 4, 2019, when a boiler exploded at the Fremont Correctional Facility in CaƱon City. Sergeant Voth's name will be added to the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial located in Washington, D.C., later this year.

The first full week of May every year is designated Correctional Officers' Week after President Ronald Reagan designated such on May 4, 1987.

May 4-8, 2020, is Teacher Appreciation Week in Mesa County

Angela Christiansen, Executive Director of the D51 Foundation, and Diana Sirko, School District 51 Superintendent, accept the Teacher Appreciation Week Proclamation from the Board of Mesa County Commissioners on Monday, May 4, 2020, during the public hearing.

The Board of Mesa County Commissioners proclaimed May 4-8, 2020, as Teacher Appreciation Week and call upon all members of our society to express their appreciation for the educators who engage, equip, and empower our learning community today for a limitless tomorrow.

Teacher Appreciation Week, May 4-8, 2020

During the unprecedented crisis the nation is facing with COVID-19, teachers across the Grand Valley have quickly adapted and are providing the same exceptional education to students through distance learning.

School District 51 Superintendent Diana Sirko thanks the Mesa County Commissioners for the proclamation.

Teachers often do not receive the recognition they deserve for dedicating their lives to the children of our community. Thank you, teachers!

22 Road from J Road to K Road to Open This Week

M.A. Concrete crews stripe the roadway and install erosion control on 22 and J.9 roads. The roadway will reopen this week.

22 Road from J Road to K Road is expected to reopen this week, crews are working on striping the roadway, installing erosion control, and finalizing work on the 22 Road and J.9 Bridge Replacement Project.

The project involved removing the existing bridge on 22 Road and installing a new box culvert along with adjusting elevations along the road for improved safety of the public traveling on 22 Road.

The old bridge, built in 1950, was structurally deficient and had a sufficiency rating of 48 out of 100. The structure and approaches were too narrow and had serious sight distance issues.

The project was identified in the Transportation Capital Program for several years, with the corridor being identified as important and needing improvements in several master plans in Mesa County.

The construction cost was paid for in part by a grant from the Colorado Department of Transportation.

M.A. Concrete crews stripe the roadway and install erosion control.
Mesa County crews conduct a walk-through of the 22 Road and J.9 Bridge Replacement Project.
Mesa County was awarded an $802,374.00 grant from the State of Colorado Department of Transportation for this project.